South Milton to Thurlestone

There is a small patch of pyramidal orchids where the coast path passes South Milton Ley nature reserve,

pyramidal orchids
pyramidal orchids

and swathes of greater knapweed with occasional agrimony.

knapweed and agrimony
greater knapweed and agrimony
greater knapweed with bee
greater knapweed
greater knapweed
greater knapweed

A solitary specimen of black horehound in the hedge opposite the cafe at South Milton sands. The leaves emit a pungent smell when crushed.

black horehound
black horehound
black horehound flowers
black horehound flowers

Prickly blue sea holly is related to the more common wild carrot.

sea holly
sea holly

wild carrot

Other plants well adapted to sand dune life are common restharrow, rock samphire, sea bindweed, and thrift.

The seaside hedgerows have pellitory-of-the-wall, dove’s foot and cut-leaved cranesbills, bittersweet, creeping cinquefoil, wood sage and honeysuckle.

pellitory of the wall
Pellitory of the wall

Seaside cabbages. I’m not 100% sure of my identifications, but here’s a rough guide. All with yellow flowers, sea radish has flowers with widely spaced petals and distinctive beaded seed pods, charlock has oval leaves with a pair of leaflets at the base, black mustard has seed pods held close to the stem. Sea rocket has fleshy leaves and white or lilac flowers.

charlock?
charlock flower
charlock leaf
charlock leaf
black mustard
black mustard

There are several species of daisy too: large, shaggy, yellow flowers of perennial sowthistlecommon fleabane, and bristly oxtongue.


Less welcome are several non-native garden species invading the fragile sand dunes: Japanese rose (Rosa rugosa) which is often used in amenity landscaping in towns, sea daisy, garden honeysuckle, and purple toadflax.


There are musk and spear thistles and marsh woundwort in the car park field and bordering the pond opposite South Milton sands. Note the flattened flowers of the beautifully scented musk thistle.

musk thistle
musk thistle
musk thistle flower
musk thistle
spear thistle
spear thistle
marsh woundwort
marsh woundwort

A hoverfly mimicking a bee:

Volucella bombylans var plumata
Volucella bombylans var. plumata
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s